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The mahogany one hundred drawer bureau
The mahogany one hundred drawer bureau
A very fine George II style mahogany and rosewood crossbanded bureau cabinet. The upper section has urn finials and a domed broken architectural cornice centered by a carved crest above two arched glazed panel ...

£28,410

In stock

Early Georgian style bureau cabinet
Early Georgian style bureau cabinet
George I style poplar burl bureau cabinet with 'broken' architectural pediment. The faux book fitted interior is finished with Chinoiserie black lacquer whilst the bureau section has a fitted interior a...

£12,200

In stock

Late Georgian style mahogany bureau desk
Late Georgian style mahogany bureau desk
An ingenious mahogany bureau desk in the George III manner. The sloping fall front encloses an elaborately fitted interior of faux books and hidden drawers and cabinets. The staircase gallery interior has suede...

£8,770

In stock

Flame mahogany bookcase
Flame mahogany bookcase
A flame mahogany and rosewood banded secrétaire bookcase, the arched cornice with brass finials above glazed doors enclosing a velvet lined interior with adjustable shelves, the base with a fall front dr...

£7,340

In stock

Gillows replica bureau
Gillows replica bureau
A movingue and macassar ebony strung bureau desk. The rectangular top has protruding rounded corners above a faux double fronted drawer with a hinged fall front which pulls out to reveal a writing surface. Belo...

£4,920

In stock

The bureau evolved in the late 17th C from portable boxes with sloping lids that were used as a writing surface. Made during the William and Mary period, the bureau had added space and storage By the 18th C the bureau had incorporated a desk with a chest of drawers. Georgian bureau tend to be larger in size than the Edwardian and 19th Century ladies writing bureau, which were a more delicate, attractive piece and were sometimes used as a dressing table. A glazed top section to the bureau would sometimes be secured to the base to create space for books, thus the evolution of the bureau bookcase. The Davenport became fashionable during the Sheraton period, it is thought that a Captain Davenport commissioned the first example. Antique davenports have a sloping writing section that sits above a case of drawers. Often the leather writing slope would pull out to form a kneehole. Normally on casters they were easily moved which was important, especially during the Regency era.

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